I’m not a fan of the super technical reviews as you can probably tell by the content on this site.  I like to offer real-world usage reviews of cameras and gear and my recent X100S Review is no exception I hope.  That said, one of the questions I’m asked a lot is with regard to the X100S ISO and hence this semi-geeky post.

It just so happened I was sat in the garden the other evening with a bottle of wine, fiddling with my camera, so I took a quick exposure through the X100S ISO range, including the expanded settings.

[pullquote align=”right”]Remember; click on the images to see the full, uncompressed out of camera JPG for each image (give them time to load, some of them ar 12MB)[/pullquote]I use the X100S a lot these days.  It’s probably my number one used camera.  It’s size, tactility and image quality is just amazing.  I’ve known how good the low light capabilities of the camera are of course but for those of you who are still wondering – take a look at the images below.

All these images are straight out of the camera JPGs.  No adjustments.  I purposefully shot these in JPG mode (-1 setting on the in camera Noise Reduction) to take advantage of the processing power inside the camera.  I’ve uploaded the full size images to Drop Box.  Simply click each image for the full size version.

All the images were shot from the table at F2.0.

I rarely set the X100S ISO expansion within the camera so I was pleasantly surprised by the results, especially the ISO 25,600 image.

Don’t get me wrong, I know there are other cameras that have amazing low light capacity sensors these days too.  My Canon 5D Mark III for example is also superb.  However, getting these results out of such a small camera, consistently, is what amazes me here.

I noticed some slight alterations in White Balance of the image across the range.  The images were shot under identical lighting conditions but it could easily be a minute adjustment in moon light, or the light that was behind me having an effect there.

You can of course make your own conclusions from the X100S ISO images, but I hope it helps with any decision making when it comes to purchasing this camera.

As always, I’ll answer any questions left in the comment sections below.

ISO-100

ISO-100

ISO-200

ISO-200
ISO-250

ISO-250

ISO-320

ISO-320

ISO-400

ISO-400

ISO-500

ISO-500

ISO-640

ISO-640

ISO-800

ISO-800

ISO-1000

ISO-1000

ISO-1250

ISO-1250

ISO-1600

ISO-1600

ISO-2000

ISO-2000

ISO-2500

ISO-2500

ISO-3200

ISO-3200

ISO-4000

ISO-4000

ISO-5000

ISO-5000

ISO-6400

ISO-6400

ISO-12800

ISO-12800

ISO-25600

ISO-25600